Publications

Articles

under review

  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., & Bonatti, L. L.. (under review). Single vs. multiple mechanism models of artificial grammar learning. .
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-Bonatti-Models,
    author = {Endress, A.D. and Bonatti, L. L.},
    title = {Single vs. multiple mechanism models of artificial grammar learning},
    year = {under review},
    owner = {endress},
    timestamp = {2015.05.27}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D.. (under review). Is there evidence for the size principle? A critical review. .
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-Size-Principle,
    author = {Endress, A. D.},
    title = {Is there evidence for the size principle? {A} critical review},
    year = {under review},
    owner = {endress},
    timestamp = {2013.09.10}
    }

2014

  • [PDF] [DOI] Endress, A. D.. (2014). How are Bayesian models really used?. Cognition, 130(1), 81-84.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-Frank-rebuttal,
    author = {Endress, A. D.},
    title = {How are {B}ayesian models really used?},
    journal = {Cognition},
    year = {2014},
    volume = {130},
    pages = {81--84},
    number = {1},
    doi = {10.1016/j.cognition.2013.09.003},
    owner = {endress},
    timestamp = {2013.09.10}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., & Potter, M. C.. (2014). Large capacity temporary visual memory. J exp psychol gen, 143(2), 548-65.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-WM-Capacity,
    author = {Endress, A. D. and Potter, M. C.},
    title = {Large capacity temporary visual memory},
    journal = {J Exp Psychol Gen},
    year = {2014},
    volume = {143},
    pages = {548--65},
    number = {2},
    owner = {endress},
    timestamp = {2013.05.26}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., & Potter, M. C.. (2014). Something from (almost) nothing: buildup of object memory from forgettable single fixations. Atten percept psychophys, 76(8), 2413-2423.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-WM-LTM,
    author = {Endress, A. D. and Potter, M. C.},
    title = {Something from (almost) nothing: Buildup of object memory from forgettable
    single fixations},
    journal = {Atten Percept Psychophys},
    year = {2014},
    volume = {76},
    pages = {2413--2423},
    number = {8},
    owner = {endress},
    timestamp = {2014.05.01}
    }
  • [PDF] Kovács, Á. M., & Endress, A. D.. (2014). Hierarchical processing in seven-month-old infants. Infancy, 19(4), 409-425.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{kovacs-hierarchy,
    author = {\'Agnes Melinda Kov\'acs and Ansgar D Endress},
    title = {Hierarchical processing in seven-month-old infants},
    journal = {Infancy},
    year = {2014},
    volume = {19},
    pages = {409--425},
    number = {4},
    owner = {endress},
    timestamp = {2014.05.19}
    }

2013

  • [PDF] [DOI] Endress, A. D.. (2013). Bayesian learning and the psychology of rule induction.. Cognition, 127(2), 159-176.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-BayesRules,
    author = {Endress, Ansgar D.},
    title = {Bayesian learning and the psychology of rule induction.},
    journal = {Cognition},
    year = {2013},
    volume = {127},
    pages = {159--176},
    number = {2},
    month = {May},
    abstract = {In recent years, Bayesian learning models have been applied to an
    increasing variety of domains. While such models have been criticized
    on theoretical grounds, the underlying assumptions and predictions
    are rarely made concrete and tested experimentally. Here, I use Frank
    and Tenenbaum's (2011) Bayesian model of rule-learning as a case
    study to spell out the underlying assumptions, and to confront them
    with the empirical results Frank and Tenenbaum (2011) propose to
    simulate, as well as with novel experiments. While rule-learning
    is arguably well suited to rational Bayesian approaches, I show that
    their models are neither psychologically plausible nor ideal observer
    models. Further, I show that their central assumption is unfounded:
    humans do not always preferentially learn more specific rules, but,
    at least in some situations, those rules that happen to be more salient.
    Even when granting the unsupported assumptions, I show that all of
    the experiments modeled by Frank and Tenenbaum (2011) either contradict
    their models, or have a large number of more plausible interpretations.
    I provide an alternative account of the experimental data based on
    simple psychological mechanisms, and show that this account both
    describes the data better, and is easier to falsify. I conclude that,
    despite the recent surge in Bayesian models of cognitive phenomena,
    psychological phenomena are best understood by developing and testing
    psychological theories rather than models that can be fit to virtually
    any data.},
    doi = {10.1016/j.cognition.2012.11.014},
    institution = { Cognitive Sciences, 43 Vassar St, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States.
    Electronic address: ansgar.endress@m4x.org.},
    language = {eng},
    medline-pst = {ppublish},
    owner = {endress},
    pii = {S0010-0277(12)00280-6},
    pmid = {23454791},
    timestamp = {2013.03.28},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2012.11.014}
    }

2012

  • [PDF] [DOI] Endress, A. D., & Potter, M. C.. (2012). Early conceptual and linguistic processes operate in independent channels. Psychol ſci, 23(3), 235-245.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-rsvp-lt,
    author = {Endress, A. D. and Potter, Mary C.},
    title = {Early conceptual and linguistic processes operate in independent
    channels},
    journal = {Psychol Sci},
    year = {2012},
    volume = {23},
    pages = {235--245},
    number = {3},
    doi = {10.1177/0956797611421485},
    owner = {endress},
    timestamp = {2011.09.12}
    }

2011

  • [PDF] [DOI] Endress, A. D., & Hauser, M. D.. (2011). The influence of type and token frequency on the acquisition of affixation patterns: ımplications for language processing.. J exp psychol learn mem cogn, 37(1), 77-95.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-TypeToken,
    author = {Ansgar D Endress and Marc D Hauser},
    title = {The influence of type and token frequency on the acquisition of affixation
    patterns: Implications for language processing.},
    journal = {J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn},
    year = {2011},
    volume = {37},
    pages = {77-95},
    number = {1},
    month = {Jan},
    abstract = {Rules, and exceptions to such rules, are ubiquitous in many domains,
    including language. Here we used simple artificial grammars to investigate
    the influence of 2 factors on the acquisition of rules and their
    exceptions, namely type frequency (the relative numbers of different
    exceptions to different regular items) and token frequency (the number
    of exception tokens relative to the number of regular tokens). We
    familiarized participants to either a prefixation pattern (where
    regulars started with /ZaI/ and exceptions ended with /ZaI/) or a
    suffixation pattern (where regulars ended with /ZaI/ and exceptions
    started with /ZaI/). We show that the type and the token frequency
    of regular items and exceptions influence in different ways what
    participants can learn. For the exceptions to be learned, they have
    to occur sufficiently often so that participants can memorize them;
    this can be achieved by a high token frequency. However, a high token
    frequency of the exceptions also impaired the acquisition of the
    regular pattern. In contrast, the type frequency of the patterns
    seemed to determine whether the regular pattern could be learned:
    When the type frequency of the regular items was sufficiently high,
    participants successfully learned the regular pattern even when the
    exceptions were played so often that 66\% of the familiarization
    items were exceptions. We discuss these findings in the context of
    general learning mechanisms and the role they may play in language
    acquisition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).},
    doi = {10.1037/a0020210},
    language = {eng},
    medline-pst = {aheadofprint},
    owner = {endress},
    pii = {2010-18053-001},
    pmid = {20804286},
    timestamp = {2011.01.24},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0020210}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., & Wood, J. N.. (2011). From movements to actions: two mechanisms for learning action sequences. Cognit psychol, 63(3), 141-171.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-Action-Axc,
    author = {Ansgar D Endress and Justin N Wood},
    title = {From movements to actions: Two mechanisms for learning action sequences},
    journal = {Cognit Psychol},
    year = {2011},
    volume = {63},
    pages = {141--171},
    number = {3},
    owner = {endress},
    timestamp = {2010.09.09}
    }

2010

  • [PDF] Endress, A. D.. (2010). Learning melodies from non-adjacent tones. Act psychol, 135(2), 182-190.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-tone-tps,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress},
    title = {Learning melodies from non-adjacent tones},
    journal = {Act Psychol},
    year = {2010},
    volume = {135},
    pages = {182--190},
    number = {2},
    owner = {endress}
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] Endress, A. D., Carden, S., Versace, E., & Hauser, M.. (2010). The apes’ edge: positional learning in chimpanzees and humans.. Anim cogn, 13(3), 483-495.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-Chimps,
    author = {Ansgar D Endress and Sarah Carden and Elisabetta Versace and Marc
    D Hauser},
    title = {The apes' edge: positional learning in chimpanzees and humans.},
    journal = {Anim Cogn},
    year = {2010},
    volume = {13},
    pages = {483-495},
    number = {3},
    abstract = {A wide variety of organisms produce actions and signals in particular
    temporal sequences, including the motor actions recruited during
    tool-mediated foraging, the arrangement of notes in the songs of
    birds, whales and gibbons, and the patterning of words in human speech.
    To accurately reproduce such events, the elements that comprise such
    sequences must be memorized. Both memory and artificial language
    learning studies have revealed at least two mechanisms for memorizing
    sequences, one tracking co-occurrence statistics among items in sequences
    (i.e., transitional probabilities) and the other one tracking the
    positions of items in sequences, in particular those of items in
    sequence-edges. The latter mechanism seems to dominate the encoding
    of sequences after limited exposure, and to be recruited by a wide
    array of grammatical phenomena. To assess whether humans differ from
    other species in their reliance on one mechanism over the other after
    limited exposure, we presented chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and
    human adults with brief exposure to six items, auditory sequences.
    Each sequence consisted of three distinct sound types (X, A, B),
    arranged according to two simple temporal rules: the A item always
    preceded the B item, and the sequence-edges were always occupied
    by the X item. In line with previous results with human adults, both
    species primarily encoded positional information from the sequences;
    that is, they kept track of the items that occurred in the sequence-edges.
    In contrast, the sensitivity to co-occurrence statistics was much
    weaker. Our results suggest that a mechanism to spontaneously encode
    positional information from sequences is present in both chimpanzees
    and humans and may represent the default in the absence of training
    and with brief exposure. As many grammatical regularities exhibit
    properties of this mechanism, it may be recruited by language and
    constrain the form that certain grammatical regularities take.},
    doi = {10.1007/s10071-009-0299-8},
    owner = {endress},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10071-009-0299-8}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., & Hauser, M. D.. (2010). Word segmentation with universal prosodic cues. Cognit psychol, 61(2), 177-199.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-cross-seg,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress and Marc D. Hauser},
    title = {Word segmentation with universal prosodic cues},
    journal = {Cognit Psychol},
    year = {2010},
    volume = {61},
    pages = {177-199},
    number = {2},
    owner = {endress}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., & Mehler, J.. (2010). Perceptual constraints in phonotactic learning.. J exp psychol hum percept perform, 36(1), 235-250.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-Phonotactics,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress and Jacques Mehler},
    title = {Perceptual Constraints in Phonotactic Learning.},
    journal = {J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform},
    year = {2010},
    volume = {36},
    pages = {235--250},
    number = {1},
    month = {Feb}
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] Hochmann, ., Endress, A. D., & Mehler, J.. (2010). Word frequency as a cue for identifying function words in infancy. Cognition, 115(3), 444-457.
    [Bibtex]
  • [PDF] Kovács, Á. M., Téglás, E., & Endress, A. D.. (2010). The social sense: susceptibility to others beliefs in human infants and adults. Science, 330(6012), 1830-1834.
    [Bibtex]

2009

  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., Cahill, D., Block, S., Jeffrey Watumull, & Hauser, M. D.. (2009). Evidence of an evolutionary precursor to human language affixation in a nonhuman primate. Biol lett, 5(6), 749-751.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-monkey-affixation,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress and Donal Cahill and Stefanie Block and Jeffrey
    Watumull and Marc D. Hauser},
    title = {Evidence of an evolutionary precursor to human language affixation
    in a nonhuman primate},
    journal = {Biol Lett},
    year = {2009},
    volume = {5},
    pages = {749--751},
    number = {6},
    month = {Dec},
    owner = {endress}
    }
  • [PDF] [DOI] Endress, A. D., & Hauser, M. D.. (2009). Syntax-induced pattern deafness.. Proc natl acad ſci u ſ a, 106(49), 21001-6.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-SyntaxDeafness,
    author = {Ansgar D Endress and Marc D Hauser},
    title = {Syntax-induced pattern deafness.},
    journal = {Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A},
    year = {2009},
    volume = {106},
    pages = {21001-6},
    number = {49},
    month = {Dec},
    abstract = {Perceptual systems often force systematically biased interpretations
    upon sensory input. These interpretations are obligatory, inaccessible
    to conscious control, and prevent observers from perceiving alternative
    percepts. Here we report a similarly impenetrable phenomenon in the
    domain of language, where the syntactic system prevents listeners
    from detecting a simple perceptual pattern. Healthy human adults
    listened to three-word sequences conforming to patterns readily learned
    even by honeybees, rats, and sleeping human neonates. Specifically,
    sequences either started or ended with two words from the same syntactic
    category (e.g., noun-noun-verb or verb-verb-noun). Although participants
    readily processed the categories and learned repetition patterns
    over nonsyntactic categories (e.g., animal-animal-clothes), they
    failed to learn the repetition pattern over syntactic categories,
    even when explicitly instructed to look for it. Further experiments
    revealed that participants successfully learned the repetition patterns
    only when they were consistent with syntactically possible structures,
    irrespective of whether these structures were attested in English
    or in other languages unknown to the participants. When the repetition
    patterns did not match such syntactically possible structures, participants
    failed to learn them. Our results suggest that when human adults
    hear a string of nouns and verbs, their syntactic system obligatorily
    attempts an interpretation (e.g., in terms of subjects, objects,
    and predicates). As a result, subjects fail to perceive the simpler
    pattern of repetitions-a form of syntax-induced pattern deafness
    that is reminiscent of how other perceptual systems force specific
    interpretations upon sensory input.},
    doi = {10.1073/pnas.0908963106},
    keywords = {, , 19920182},
    owner = {endress},
    pii = {0908963106},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0908963106}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., & Mehler, J.. (2009). Primitive computations in speech processing. Q j exp psychol, 62(11), 2187-2209.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-AXC-Edge,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress and Jacques Mehler},
    title = {Primitive computations in speech processing},
    journal = {Q J Exp Psychol},
    year = {2009},
    volume = {62},
    pages = {2187--2209},
    number = {11},
    month = {Nov}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., & Mehler, J.. (2009). The surprising power of statistical learning: when fragment knowledge leads to false memories of unheard words. J mem lang, 60(3), 351-367.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-Phantoms,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress and Jacques Mehler},
    title = {The surprising power of statistical learning: When fragment knowledge
    leads to false memories of unheard words},
    journal = {J Mem Lang},
    year = {2009},
    volume = {60},
    pages = {351-367},
    number = {3},
    owner = {endress}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., Nespor, M., & Mehler, J.. (2009). Perceptual and memory constraints on language acquisition. Trends cogn ſci, 13(8), 348-353.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-TICS,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress and Marina Nespor and Jacques Mehler},
    title = {Perceptual and memory constraints on language acquisition},
    journal = {Trends Cogn Sci},
    year = {2009},
    volume = {13},
    pages = {348--353},
    number = {8},
    month = {Aug},
    owner = {endress}
    }

2008

  • [PDF] [DOI] Toro, J. M., Shukla, M., Nespor, M., & Endress, A. D.. (2008). The quest for generalizations over consonants: asymmetries between consonants and vowels are not the by-product of acoustic differences.. Percept psychophys, 70(8), 1515-1525.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Toro2008-salience,
    author = {Juan M Toro and Mohinish Shukla and Marina Nespor and Ansgar D Endress},
    title = {The quest for generalizations over consonants: asymmetries between
    consonants and vowels are not the by-product of acoustic differences.},
    journal = {Percept Psychophys},
    year = {2008},
    volume = {70},
    pages = {1515--1525},
    number = {8},
    month = {Nov},
    __markedentry = {[endress]},
    abstract = {Consonants and vowels may play different roles during language processing,
    consonants being preferentially involved in lexical processing, and
    vowels tending to mark syntactic constituency through prosodic cues.
    In support of this view, artificial language learning studies have
    demonstrated that consonants (C) support statistical computations,
    whereas vowels (V) allow certain structural generalizations. Nevertheless,
    these asymmetries could be mere by-products of lower level acoustic
    differences between Cs and Vs, in particular the energy they carry,
    and thus their relative salience. Here we address this issue and
    show that vowels remain the preferred targets for generalizations,
    even when consonants are made highly salient or vowels barely audible.
    Participants listened to speech streams of nonsense CVCVCV words,
    in which consonants followed a simple ABA structure. Participants
    failed to generalize this structure over sonorant consonants (Experiment
    1), even when vowel duration was reduced to one third of that of
    consonants (Experiment 2). When vowels were eliminated from the stream,
    participants showed only a marginal evidence of generalizations (Experiment
    4). In contrast, participants readily generalized the structure over
    barely audible vowels (Experiment 3). These results show that different
    roles of consonants and vowels cannot be readily reduced to acoustical
    and perceptual differences between these phonetic categories.},
    doi = {10.3758/PP.70.8.1515},
    institution = {Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste, Italy.},
    keywords = {Generalization (Psychology); Humans; Phonetics; Reaction Time; Speech
    Acoustics; Speech Perception},
    language = {eng},
    medline-pst = {ppublish},
    owner = {endress},
    pii = {70/8/1515},
    pmid = {19064494},
    timestamp = {2011.01.31},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/PP.70.8.1515}
    }
  • [PDF] Versace, E., Endress, A. D., & Hauser, M. D.. (2008). Pattern recognition mediates flexible timing of vocalizations in nonhuman primates: experiments with cottontop tamarins. Animal behaviour, 76(6), 1885-1892.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Versace2008,
    author = {Elisabetta Versace and Ansgar D. Endress and Marc D. Hauser},
    title = {Pattern recognition mediates flexible timing of vocalizations in
    nonhuman primates: experiments with cottontop tamarins},
    journal = {Animal Behaviour},
    year = {2008},
    volume = {76},
    pages = {1885 -- 1892},
    number = {6},
    abstract = {To maximize transmission in noisy environments, vocalizing animals
    have evolved capacities to avoid the masking effects of biotic and
    abiotic sound sources, such as changing the structure and timing
    of acoustic signals. Here we explore this problem from a new angle,
    asking whether animals can extract predictive acoustic cues from
    an intermittently noisy environment and use this information to guide
    the timing of their vocalizations. In a series of experiments, we
    presented cottontop tamarins, Saguinus oedipus, with loud noise interrupted
    by speech syllables and silence. The silences were either long enough
    to accommodate the full length of their species-specific contact
    calls or too short. The task, in brief, was for tamarins to pick
    out the acoustic cues predicting long versus short gaps of silence,
    and to time their vocalizations to follow cues associated with long
    gaps. Consistently, and across all subjects tested, tamarins were
    able to extract the acoustic cues predicting the long gaps, using
    them to call in the long gaps and consequently, avoiding both the
    energetic and masking costs of calling in noise. We discuss these
    findings and the potential applications of this technique to broader
    questions of pattern recognition and the flexible use of vocal signals
    in a noisy environment.},
    issn = {0003-3472},
    keywords = {auditory learning}
    }

2007

  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., & Bonatti, L. L.. (2007). Rapid learning of syllable classes from a perceptually continuous speech stream. Cognition, 105(2), 247-299.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-AXC,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress and Luca L. Bonatti},
    title = {Rapid learning of syllable classes from a perceptually continuous
    speech stream},
    journal = {Cognition},
    year = {2007},
    volume = {105},
    pages = {247--299},
    number = {2}
    }
  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., Dehaene-Lambertz, G., & Mehler, J.. (2007). Perceptual constraints and the learnability of simple grammars. Cognition, 105(3), 577-614.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-Triplets,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress and Ghislaine Dehaene-Lambertz and Jacques Mehler},
    title = {Perceptual constraints and the learnability of simple grammars},
    journal = {Cognition},
    year = {2007},
    volume = {105},
    pages = {577--614},
    number = {3},
    month = {Dec}
    }

2005

  • [PDF] Endress, A. D., Scholl, B. J., & Mehler, J.. (2005). The role of salience in the extraction of algebraic rules.. J exp psychol gen, 134(3), 406-19.
    [Bibtex]
    @ARTICLE{Endress-ABCDEFF,
    author = {Ansgar D. Endress and Brian J Scholl and Jacques Mehler},
    title = {The role of salience in the extraction of algebraic rules.},
    journal = {J Exp Psychol Gen},
    year = {2005},
    volume = {134},
    pages = {406-19},
    number = {3},
    abstract = {Recent research suggests that humans and other animals have sophisticated
    abilities to extract both statistical dependencies and rule-based
    regularities from sequences. Most of this research stresses the flexibility
    and generality of such processes. Here the authors take up an equally
    important project, namely, to explore the limits of such processes.
    As a case study for rule-based generalizations, the authors demonstrate
    that only repetition-based structures with repetitions at the edges
    of sequences (e.g., ABCDEFF but not ABCDDEF) can be reliably generalized,
    although token repetitions can easily be discriminated at both sequence
    edges and middles. This finding suggests limits on rule-based sequence
    learning and new interpretations of earlier work alleging rule learning
    in infants. Rather than implementing a computerlike, formal process
    that operates over all patterns equally well, rule-based learning
    may be a highly constrained and piecemeal process driven by perceptual
    primitives--specialized type operations that are highly sensitive
    to perceptual factors. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).},
    owner = {endress},
    pii = {2005-09704-007}
    }
  • Shukla, M., & Endress, A. D.. (2005). Crash blindness in an ınveterate apple user: a case ſtudy Trieste, Italy: SISSA.
    [Bibtex]
    @TECHREPORT{CrashBlindness,
    author = {Mohinish Shukla and Ansgar D. Endress},
    title = {Crash Blindness in an Inveterate Apple User: A Case Study},
    institution = {SISSA},
    year = {2005},
    address = {Trieste, Italy},
    abstract = {We repor t a brief case study of Crash Blindness in a long-term user
    of the Macintosh computers. The patient (LB), an otherwise normal,
    healthy adult, shows an almost complete blindness to software crashes
    on Macintosh computers. The degree of the pathology appears to correlate
    with the version of the operating system. An MRI shows an atypical
    lesion in the right frontal cor tex, which is the only neurological
    pathology. A comparison is made with other operating systems to show
    the specificity to the Mac OS. The findings are discussed with respect
    to theories of software `Holy Wars'.},
    owner = {endress},
    url = {http://psy.ck.sissa.it/perso/lucapapers/CrashBlindness.pdf}
    }

 

Chapters

2008

  • [PDF] Mehler, J., Endress, A. D., Gervain, J., & Marina Nespor. (2008). From perception to grammar. In Friederici, A. D., & Thierry, G. (Eds.), In Early language development: bridging brain and behaviour (, Vol. 5, pp. 191-213). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Mehler-Tilar,
    author = {Mehler, Jacques and Ansgar D. Endress and Judit Gervain and Marina
    Nespor},
    title = {From perception to grammar},
    booktitle = {Early Language Development: Bridging Brain and Behaviour},
    publisher = {John Benjamins},
    year = {2008},
    editor = {Friederici, Angela D. and Guillaume Thierry},
    volume = {5},
    series = {rends in Language Acquisition Research (TiLAR)},
    chapter = {8},
    pages = {191--213},
    address = {Amsterdam},
    owner = {endress}
    }

2007

  • Mehler, J., Gervain, J., Endress, A. D., & Shukla M.. (2007). Mechanisms of language acquisition: imaging and behavioral evidence. In Nelson, C. A., & Luciana, M. (Eds.), Handbook of developmental cognitive neuroscience (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
    [Bibtex]
    @INCOLLECTION{Mehler2007,
    author = {Mehler, J. and Gervain, J. and Endress, A.D. and Shukla, M.,},
    title = {Mechanisms of language acquisition: imaging and behavioral evidence},
    booktitle = {Handbook of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience},
    publisher = {MIT Press},
    year = {2007},
    editor = {C. A. Nelson and M. Luciana},
    address = {Cambridge, MA},
    edition = {2nd},
    owner = {endress},
    timestamp = {2015.05.29}
    }

 

Ph.D. theses

2005

  • [PDF] Endress, A. D.. ((2005). Limitations perceptives et reprsentationnelles des computations symboliques mentales.). Unpublished unpublished PhD Thesis, Paris, France.
    [Bibtex]